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WHO ARE WE ?

 

The Astronomical Society of the Desert is a non-profit organization composed of amateur astronomers from all walks of life.  Our skills range from beginner to advanced, and our ages range from 9 to 90.   Our goal is to educate the public about astronomical phenomenon and to foster an appreciation of the beauty of the cosmos.

We hold public star parties once a month from October thru May at the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument  Visitors Center, located at 51-500 Hwy 111 in Palm Desert.  The public is invited FREE of charge.  Telescopes and giant binoculars are provided by club members.  All we ask is that you come with lots of questions.     A tour of the sky pointing out all of the Constellations and Planets visible that night is given at the beginning of each star party.  Observed through our telescopes and binoculars are Star clusters, Planets, Nebulae, Galaxies, Comets, Meteors, and other deep sky objects.   Please dress warmly as the nights do get cold.

Star parties are held at our Sawmill Trail Observing site from monthly on a year round basis.  Click here for directions.

We hold several lecture meetings per year at the Portola Community Center, 45-480 Portola Avenue, Palm Desert, 92260.  Guest speakers, some Internationally known astronomers, discuss the latest topics in Astronomy.  Talks are followed by a question and answer period.  These meetings are also FREE.                                                                                                                            

ASOD members also give presentations at the Living Desert, participate in Earth Day activities, and put on star parties for schools and other Civic organizations.

Our best attended star party was in March 1997, when we held a Lunar eclipse and Comet Hale-Bopp party,  This was attended by approximately 1,000 people and covered by both local television stations, local radio stations, and  "THE DESERT SUN."

 

Most people like the day, but Astronomers prefer the NIGHT!

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